Jul 16, 2015

GREETINGS IN DIFFERENT PARTS OF THE WORLD

Shares

Handshakes, cheek-to-cheeks, brofists, hugs and hand waves are what we see as usual actions when greeting someone. But don’t you know there are many more unusual greetings besides these?

1 . GREETINGS IN CHINA

Handshaking is a silent way of greeting which is more common in China, although it is a popularly used form of greeting in many countries worldwide. Many western countries accept hugs and kisses as a popular form of greeting, although a handshake is still the formal way of greeting people. In China, a handshake or a simple and kind salutation is common. It is common on most social occasions as an expression of courtesy and greeting when people meet or say goodbye to each other. Besides, handshaking is also a way to express congratulations, thanks and motivation to others.

Source

2. GREETINGS IN EUROPE

After verbal greetings, the handshake is by far the most common form of greeting among both males and females in Europe. This is especially true for the first meeting. In England, adults, across all levels of society, a handshake of greeting and on parting.

Source

3. GREETINGS IN INDIA

You are going to impress your Indian partner or client if you greet them in their native language.To greet in India, Say Namaste while pressing both your palms together, fingers touching one another and pointing upward, and making a simple bow.
The most common way of spelling out their personal names is to begin with the given name then the family name. However, in some areas, some men don’t have any family name. Make sure you can verify to them the right way of saying their complete name. Women usually make use of their husband’s family name once they get married.

Source

4. GREETINGS IN JAPAN

If you travel to Japan, knowing how to bow and greet in Japan can be helpful. Bowing is an important custom in Japan. People commonly greet each other by bowing instead of handshaking, and people generally have a small conversation after or before they bow. This custom is used constantly in Japan. You may even see people bowing while on the phone. Keep in mind that men and women bow differently—men usually keep their hands at their sides, while women put their hands together on their thighs with their fingers touching.

Source

5. GREETINGS IN MONGOLIA

In Mongolia when people greet each other during a ceremony or a festival, they will offer their snuff bottles in the upturned palm of their right hand with the lid partially opened. The person being greeted will take out a pinch of snuff using the small spoon attached to the lid. Then they place the pinch of tobacco on the back of their hand before “snuffing” it up their nose. Even if you don’t want to sniff any snuff that day, it’s respectful to hold the bottle close to your nose, to smell the fragrance before passing it back.

Source

6. GREETINGS IN NEW ZEALAND

In New Zealand, they have a traditional Maori greeting called hongi. Hongi involves the rubbing or touching of noses when two people meet. This act is referred to as the “ha” or the “breath of life” which is considered to have come from the gods.

Source

7. GREETINGS IN TIBET

Tibetans say welcome by sticking out their tongues. This tradition has been practiced since the 9th century during the time of Lang Darma, a Tibetan king known to have a black tongue. The people were scared that he’ll be reincarnated, so they start sticking out their tongues when meeting someone to prove that they aren’t evil. This greeting is often accompanied by placing their palms down in front of their chest.

Source

8. GREETINGS IN PHILIPPINES

In the Philippines, it’s important that the young ones greet the elderly people by holding the elder’s right hand, leaning forward, and making sure that the knuckles will reach and press the greeter’s forehead while saying “Mano po.”

Source

9. GREETINGS IN THAILAND

To perform thi traditional greeting, place your palm at the chest then bow your head so that your thums touch your chin and your fingertips touch your forehead.

Source

10. GREETINGS IN GREENLAND

The people of Greenland have special greeting known as the Kunik. Participants place their nose and top lip on the cheek or forehead of their companion and greet in.

Source

11. GREETINGS IN MALAYSIA

Stretching out both your hands to your companion and lightly touch their hands before bringing your hands back towards your heart.

Source

12.GREETINGS IN SAUDI ARABIA

In Saudi Arabia, as in other Middle Eastern countries, Muslims will very often greet each other with a handshake and say “As-salamu alaykum”. Men may greet with kissing cheeks, and placing the left hand on the other’s right shoulder.

Source

13. GREETINGS IN GERMANY

In germany the polite way to greet someone is to shake their hands.

Source

14. GREETINGS IN UAE

Traditional greetings of the United Arab Emirates A’salam aleikum’ (Peace be upon you) reply with: ‘Wa aleikum a’salam ( and peace be upon you)

Source

Do you want to try doing these? how do you greet your loved ones? comment below and let us know.

Feature

Shares

Subscribe to trendyFeeds. Our newsletters will light up your inbox

ON FACEBOOK
ON TWITTER
ON GOOGLE+
ON PINTEREST
trendyfeeds